Testimonial #48: Bryan Austermann, NYC Actor

How has your life been indelibly touched by a teacher who utilized the arts for whatever reason and acknowledge how they were instrumental in breaking the mold to allow you to become who you are today?

Bryann Madison County

Let [him] sing for you monsieur. [He’s] been well taught.” Tonight I got to perform for my 5th Grade teacher who I haven’t seen in about ten years. I’ve kept in touch with her from time to time and it was such a thrill to have her, I kid you not, BEAMING in the front row. It’s because of her that I saw my first Broadway show and realized what I wanted to do with my life. And tonight is proof enough that being in this gorgeously beautiful play is who I am and who I want to be. And Mrs. Arduini, I will always think of you fondly.
Bryann and Teacher

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National Arts in Education Week

Arts in Education Week

Passed by Congress in 2010, House Resolution 275 designates the week beginning with the second Sunday in September as National Arts in Education Week. During this week, the field of arts education joins together in communities across the country to tell the story of the impact of the transformative power of the arts in education. Watch the video and join us in the celebration!

  1. Celebrate. Host a celebration in your community, whether big or small, an existing event, or a new one. Download and use the shared logo and be sure to register your event on ArtsMeet, a national arts event calendar.
  2. Advocate. Work with your elected officials and decision-makers to share the value of the arts in education. Whether a mayor, principal, or U.S. Congressman, check out sample resolutions and videos, send an op-ed to your local newspaper, and use the Arts Education Navigator—an online tool with six action steps to crafting a personal advocacy plan. Be sure to sign the petition encouraging Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to support the arts!
  3. Participate. Share your story in the social media campaign, #BecauseOfArtsEd, to bring national visibility to the issue of arts education. See below for more information and download the How To Guide. Also, be sure to attend and invite friends to the Facebook Event.

A Conversation with …Marcina Zaccaria, Playwright/Director VILLAGE, MY HOME

Being a playwright, a critic, and a theater director has given me the opportunity to work with such smart, creative people, who every day search for deeper meaning.  The world can be a challenging place, so I ask myself: What role does our belief structure play?  Is it our friends who lift us out of difficult times?  
Marcina Zaccaria is directing the debut of her new play VILLAGE, MY HOME at the DREAM UP FESTIVAL at Theater for the New City.  We had a chance to chat about her play and what it means to be playwright, director, and arts advocate.
MARCINA PICTURE
Share with us a little bit about the germ of the play.  How did it come about?  What was its evolution? 
I used to live in Greenwich Village, and my first husband was a filmmaker who later won an Emmy Award for his work as an Editor for television.  Greenwich Village is sort of Mecca for artists.  When I reflected on what is like to live in such a creative environment every day, I, of course, experienced a wide range of emotions.  
I was so impressed by how “interconnected” the world can be, particularly when you involve people in different stages of their lives.  Also, I thought a lot about the difference between theater and film.  Both are truthful, and shed light on the human condition.  With theater, you can hear the voice re-bounding in space, so it’s very differently “live” than film.  I kept interrogating these ideas about the difference between theater and film, and I tried to find a way for sight to be as important as sound.  Also, I love multi-media art.  So, what began as a concept for a multi-media play became a theater piece, with a Facebook component. 
We were thrilled when the show got accepted to the Dream Up Festival at Theater for the New City.  This would provide a possibility for a live audience in a physical theater space, while, at the same time, not completely abandoning the notion of “live” camera coverage, that would be in use on stage. 
What outcomes do you hope to have with the premier of VILLAGE, MY HOME? 
I hope people will find humor in the show.  Also, I hope that plenty of people will chat with their friends about Village, My Home, and talk about the images. 
The play struggles with the notion of enlightenment, and I hope that the audience can find some recognition in the every day dilemmas they see onstage.
How have The Arts personally impacted your life? 
The arts have had an enormous impact on my life. When I decided to go to Drama School at Tisch School of the Arts, I had no idea that I would wind up feeling so rewarded by the journey I have taken over the last 20+ years.  
Being a playwright, a critic, and a theater director has given me the opportunity to work with such smart, creative people, who every day search for deeper meaning.  The world can be a challenging place, so I ask myself: What role does our belief structure play?  Is it our friends who lift us out of difficult times?  
I do believe in the transformative nature of theater, and I was so glad that Village, My Home is going to be performed the East Village in NYC.  It’s just a very spiritually sound place.
Dream Festival

VILLAGE, MY HOME BY MARCINA ZACCARIA
An exploration of the Village’s many colorful characters

August 27 to September 3, 2017
Theater for the New City,
155 First Avenue

Community Space Theater

Sunday, August 27 at 5:00 PM 

Tuesday, August 29 at 9:00 PM,

Thursday, August 31 at 9:00 PM 

Friday, September 1 at 9:00 PM,

Saturday, September 2 at 2:00 PM 

Sunday, September 3 at 8:00 PM


Tickets $15. Box Office: (212) 254-1109, http://www.dreamupfestival.org
Running Time: 45 minutes. Critics are invited to all performances.
Buy Tickets

In preparation for the New Year, a Village housewife joins businesspeople, locals and tourists as they question what matters to them. As technology continues to fascinate, isolate and shape our lives, how do we encounter our New York City? Village, My Home,  written and directed by Marcina Zaccaria, embraces the very human experience of what it means to live and survive in the 21st century against the backdrop of cultural and political uncertainties.

With theatrical movement and state-of-the-art sound design, Village, My Home promises to warm the heart and calm the most unsettling times.

Village, My Home stars LPTW Member Frances McGarry; Marjorie Conn*; Michael C. O’Day*; Kelsey Shapira; Jeff Burchfield*; Madalyn McKay; Christina Ashby; Maile Souza Sean Evans; Maria Severny; Stephanie Roseman; Meaghan Adawe McLeod; Rebecca Genéve; and Catherine Luciani. Jak Prince is the lighting designer. Maria Ortiz Poveda is the costume designer. Dana Robbins is stage managing.
*Appears Courtesy of Actor’s Equity

The eighth annual Dream Up Festival is an ultimate new work festival, dedicated to the joy of discovering new authors and edgy, innovative performances. Audiences savor the excitement, awe, passion, challenge and intrigue of new plays from around the country and around the world.

The festival does not seek out traditional scripts that are presented in a traditional way. It selects works that push new ideas to the forefront, challenge audience expectations and make us question our understanding of how art illuminates the world around us.

A unique and varied selection of productions will again be offered that draw upon a variety of performance specialties including singing, clowning, poetry, street music, magic and movement. The Festival’s founders, Crystal Field and Michael Scott-Price, feel this is especially needed in our present time of declining donations to the arts, grants not being awarded due to market conditions, and arts funding cuts on almost every level across the country and abroad.

Extraordinary Women Telling an Extraordinary Story: SHADOWS ROUND THE MOON

“This is a story of incredible love and extraordinary loss. The play is a chance to introduce an amazing woman to the world since Mary Shelley has not received the attention she deserves. People will be astounded to learn about the many tragedies she suffered. And yet, she survived. This play allows her to talk about how she did that, in her own words, her own voice.” ~ Kate Burton

“Many people know Mary Shelley as the writer of Frankenstein, but they don’t know what an extraordinary person she was,” says actress Kate Burton. “I didn’t know until I read Janice’s play.”

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Mary Shelley, author FRANKENSTEIN

Shadows Round the Moon came to Kate after playwright Janice Kennedy presented an excerpt at the Santa Monica Library and an actor in the audience asked her for a copy of the script. “He contacted me later and said he knew someone who would be a great match for the material, ” remembers Janice. “I didn’t know it was Kate, but he was absolutely right. Kate is perfect.”

Janice had a chance to see Kate as Mary Shelley when Kate did a reading of Shadows Round the Moon at a Women in Film benefit in Los Angeles. “It was extraordinary to watch her,” says Janice. “Even with no movement or staging, Kate transformed herself into Mary Shelley and the audience was mesmerized. They gave her a well-deserved standing ovation.”

Flash forward to Spring 2017 with Kate in a critically acclaimed revival of Present Laughter on Broadway. Kate and Janice decided this would be a good time to introduce Shadows Round the Moon to New York people. They set up an informal presentation at the Dramatists Guild and invited several Broadway producers and a rep from the Williamstown Theatre Festival. Janice gave an overview of the play and Kate read a couple of excerpts. The May presentation was so successful that a full reading of the play took place this past Wednesday, July 12th at the Dramatists Guild.

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Janice Kennedy and Kate Burton   Photo Credit Ellis Gaskell 

 

“This is a story of incredible love and extraordinary loss,” says Kate. “The play is a chance to introduce an amazing woman to the world since Mary Shelley has not received the attention she deserves. People will be astounded to learn about the many tragedies she suffered. And yet, she survived. This play allows her to talk about how she did that, in her own words, her own voice.”

 

To find that voice, Janice read Mary’s letters and journals as well as biographies of Mary and her husband, the Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Janice found that even though Frankenstein was a publishing sensation, Mary did not receive much money for it. Copyright laws at the time she wrote the book did not favor the “creators” of literary works and music.

After Percy Shelley died, Mary was dependent on her father-in-law for money and forbidden by him to write Percy’s biography, even though she was constantly asked to do so by publishers. “This became the catalyst for the play,” says Janice. “What if Mary, as a way to write about Percy, wrote the story of her own life?”

This story begins with the death of Mary’s mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, when she was but a few days old. In the play, Mary Shelley talks about this being her introduction to “Mr. Bones,” her personification of Death.

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Kate Burton Photo Credit Ellis Gaskell 

The death of Mary Wollstonecraft reverberated throughout England because she was both revered and reviled as the founder of modern feminism with her book, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. After Wollstonecraft’s death,  Mary was raised by her father, William Godwin, a radical philosopher whose house was often visited by other philosophers and poets of the day, including Percy Shelley. As Mary grew up, she often hid on the stairs to listen to the talk of these men.

Kate Burton says she can relate to this experience of Mary’s. Recently, an old friend of her father’s came to see Kate in Present Laughter. He told her of sitting on the stairs as a child and listening in on the gatherings his father would have with people like Noel Coward, John Gielgud, Terrence Rattigan and Somerset Maugham.

At sixteen, Mary meets and falls in love with Percy Shelley at her father’s house. Janice’s research told her that the relationship that developed was not typical of the times. “Percy was devoted to the writings of Mary Wollstonecraft and truly believed the younger Mary was his equal — that she was as smart as or smarter than him,” says Janice. “Percy and Mary fell deeply in love and established an extraordinary partnership where they fueled each other’s ideas. Unfortunately, their life together was marked by tragedy after tragedy that began with the death of their first child when she was but a few days old.”

A few days after their baby’s death, Mary woke to tell Percy that she dreamed their little girl was “only cold and that we rubbed her by the fire, and she lived.” This dream of “reanimation,” Mary would say later, provided the seed for Frankenstein.

Two more of Mary and Percy’s children would die as small children and Mary suffered a miscarriage while in Italy that almost took her life as well. It was in Italy that Mary and the world suffered the loss of Percy Bysshe Shelley when he drowned at age 29 while sailing in the Mediterranean. Mary was only 25.

“These are things I do not want to remember,” Mary says in the play. “But remember I must, as we all must. What we have known, we cannot cease to know.”

Janice says she titled her play “Shadows Round the Moon” because Percy Shelley used the moon as his symbol for Mary in his poetry. And as Mary recounts her life in the play, all of the deaths she endured are like shadows surrounding and haunting her. “I made it a one-woman drama so that Mary is finally the focus of the story,” says Janice. “While Mary was alive, no one but Percy seemed to realize her brilliance. The irony is that he was largely credited with writing Frankenstein, something he consistently denied.”

Critics especially had a hard time believing that a young woman, only 17 at the time, could have written such a tale. One reviewer of Frankenstein exclaimed that “this is the foulest toadstool that has sprung up on the dung heap of mankind.”

“But what do critics, know?” counters Kate, who seems to intuitively understand Mary Shelley since Mary was raised in a “British culture” as she was. And Kate grew up in an artistic and literary family as well. Her father, Richard Burton, was an actor as was her mother Sybil, who became a literary agent and then a theatre manager. Sybil, in fact, founded The Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor, NY. But Kate says she didn’t know she was going to pursue the arts until her senior year of college:

I was going to be a diplomat but in my senior year at Brown, I decided to apply to drama schools. I knew that as the daughter of a famous actor, I would need all the proper  training. The basic decision became whether I would go to graduate school in England or  America because I am a British National. So, that was the only big fight in the family. Not with my mom, but with my dad. He wanted me to go to Britain and I said no, I was an American. So I went to Yale. I had a very interesting, good, and hard time while I was there. My first big job after graduate school was playing the ingénue in Present Laughter directed by George C. Scott, which was crazy.

For nearly 17 years, Kate was a working actress and then in her 40s, Hedda Gabler and The Elephant Man came along and “that changed my life as an actress because suddenly I was being moved into a different pantheon: I was no longer an ingénue and I was no longer a character actress. I could do more. That was 16 years ago. Then I went through a fallow period and I auditioned for this television show about doctors called Grey’s Anatomy. I was to be the mom of the leading lady, a mom who had early onset Alzheimer’s. I thought , ‘Oh my God, what a horrible thing.’ And I ended up [with] THAT [changing] my life and that was great.”

What does Kate think about the challenge of doing a one-woman show like Shadows Round the Moon?  “It’s very hard learning an hour-and-twenty-minute monologue and then, of course, I love being on stage with my fellow actors. But it has to be Mary’s story. It has to be her voice.”

Realizing the significance of providing role models, Kate values women writers like Mary Shelley and playwright Janice Kennedy.  “We’re in a time when women are being heralded in a way they haven’t been before . . . I am glad that women are being rewarded not because they’re women but because they’ve done a fantastic job.  We have two plays on Broadway right now written by women and that’s exciting.  They’re both Pulitzer Prize winners from before. They have stayed the course.”

Kate’s career arc is one built over the years:  “I came into my own in my 40s,” she says. “For me, now it’s about focusing in on what I really want to do for the rest of my time.”

After taking five years off from being active in the Union, Kate is running for the Council at Actor’s Equity  “because I know that I’m good at that, I know that I’m good at being a Union person. That’s a place that I can be helpful.” She is on the board of Broadway Cares and works with the AIDS Foundation in AIDS education. Her life is good, says Kate, and she wants to give back.

“I am very lucky to be in this amazing Broadway production right now that is going incredibly well critically and financially,” she says. “It’s so thrilling. Now, I’m about to become a “Professor of Practice” at the University of Southern California in August.” Kate’s husband, Michael Ritchie, is the artistic director of the Center Theatre Group (CTG) in LA so she’s happy she’ll be living on the West Coast again. The CTG includes the Taper Forum, the Ahmanson and the Kirk Douglas theatres.

And the best is yet to come with the possibility of her own one-woman show about Mary Shelley. Helen Mirren once said, “Your 40s are good. Your 50s are great. Your 60s are fab.  And 70 is fucking awesome.“ Kate would probably agree with that as she looks forward to more incredible opportunities coming her way.

For more information about the play contact Janice Kennedy

Pan Asian Repertory presents ACQUITTAL

Pan Asian Repertory Theatre expands new ground with ACQUITTAL, building on past explorations of untold stories from countries in conflict, with Shaheed Nadeem’s powerful, acclaimed play from Pakistan, which spurred the Women’s Rights Movement in the 80’s.  We see, daily, new examples of violations against women in all guises globally –large and small, blatant and subliminal, publicized and covert — and ACQUITTAL  affirms that collectively.  In resistance, we can make a difference, for social justice and change.  Pan Asian is proud to welcome this extraordinary work to the New York Stage.

We are all imprisoned in separate places,”  a line spoken from ACQUITTAL, by Shahid Nadeem, expresses the thematic thrust of the play:  tightly woven narratives about four women who lived in Pakistan in the early 1980’s during the aftermath of the military coup led by General Mohammad Zia-ul-Haq.

The tautly-talented ensemble of Aizzah Fatima, Shetal Shah, Gulshan Mia, and Salma Shaw, deftly directed by Noelle Ghoussaini exposes each character’s ethical core with authenticity lacking any didactic deference; instead, their camaraderie unfolds with a natural human curiosity to understand each other’s dilemmas thereby allowing the audience to empathize with them and raise their hopes for each of their acquittals.

I don’t want to give away any spoilers, other than to encourage everyone to see this play — not only for its candid treatment of the continuing challenge of garnering equal rights for ALL women, but also to “sensitize the masses”  — the notion that theatre brings people together in a dark room to witness the human condition.  And in today’s divisive political climate we can all benefit from stepping in the shoes of these women to consider what change we can bring to our culture.

Opening Night, Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 8 pm

Performances of ACQUITTAL:
The Studio Theatre on 4fl at Theatre Row (410 W. 42nd St.) in New York City June 10-25, 2017.
Tues through Sat at 7:30PM and matinees Sat & Sun at 2:30PM.
Tickets are $62.25 for Opening Night (June 15, 2017, includes post-show reception with cast) and $42.25 for all other performances and can be purchased by calling 212-239-6200 or online at http://www.telecharge.com. For instructions on how to receive discounts for students and IDNYC Members, please call 212-868-4030.

Click here for ACQUITTAL Tickets