Presidential Proclamation — National Arts and Humanities Month, 2016

This month, we acknowledge all those who have proudly and passionately dedicated their lives to these diverse, beautiful, and often challenging forms of expression. In our increasingly global economy, we recognize the power of the arts and humanities to connect people around the world. Be it through the pen of a poet, the voice of a singer, or the canvas of a painter, let us continue to harness the unparalleled ways the arts and humanities bring people together.

obama-arts

NATIONAL ARTS AND HUMANITIES MONTH, 2016

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

 

 

Throughout history, the arts and humanities have been at the forefront of progress. In diverse mediums and methods — whether through the themes of a novel, the movement of a dancer, or a monologue on a stage — the arts enrich our souls, inspire us to chase our dreams, and challenge us to see things through a different lens. During National Arts and Humanities Month, we celebrate the important role the arts and humanities have played in shaping the American narrative.

Our achievements as a society and a culture go hand-in-hand. The arts embody who we are as a people and have long helped drive the success of our country. They provoke thought and encourage our citizenry to reach new heights in creativity and innovation; they lift up our identities, connecting what is most profound within us to our collective human experiences.

In seeking to break down barriers and challenge our assumptions, we must continue promoting and prioritizing the arts and humanities, especially for our young people. In many ways, the arts and humanities reflect our national soul. They are central to who we are as Americans — as dreamers and storytellers, creators and visionaries. By investing in the arts, we can chart a course for the future in which the threads of our common humanity are bound together with creative empathy and openness. When we engage with the arts, we instill principles that, at their core, make us truer to ourselves.

This month, we acknowledge all those who have proudly and passionately dedicated their lives to these diverse, beautiful, and often challenging forms of expression. In our increasingly global economy, we recognize the power of the arts and humanities to connect people around the world. Be it through the pen of a poet, the voice of a singer, or the canvas of a painter, let us continue to harness the unparalleled ways the arts and humanities bring people together.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 2016 as National Arts and Humanities Month. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs to celebrate the arts and the humanities in America.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-first.

BARACK OBAMA

Memorial Day 2016

 

Lin Manuel Art Advocacy

As we celebrate our bravest of soldiers who gave their ultimate sacrifice to protect our  freedom, I would like you to take some time to reflect on what it means to be An American.  Amid the bitterness and rancor of the 2016 Elections. . .

How haveThe Arts ( Dance, Theatre, Music, Photography, Graphic Arts) prompt a change in your life?

How did it change and/or alter your perspective about a viewpoint?

Share you story with First Online With Fran HERE

League of Professional Theatre’s NETWORKING MONDAYS; Meet the Music Makers!

In our continuing effort to develop and promote women in the professional theatre  we invite you to . . .

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NETWORKING MONDAYS

 Insights, Information, and Inspiration

Join your colleagues, expand your networks, bring a potential new member!

Monday, October 5, 2015, 6pm-8pm

Meet the Music Makers: Composers & Lyricists and

Special Guests discussing the Creative, Legal, and Financial Aspects of Songwriting


 Ripley Grier Studios 520 8th Avenue, Studio 16T

 Panelists include GEORGIA STITT (Snow Child, My Lifelong Love); DONNA MOORE (Cougar The Musical); JUNE RACHELSON-OSPA & ALLISON BREWSTER-FRANZETTI (The True Colors of Weedle); CARMEL OWEN (Asylum: The Strange Case of Mary Lincoln); PAMELA GOLINSKI (Entertainment Attorney FGR & S PLLC); and TED CHAPIN (President, Rodgers & Hammerstein)

Light Refreshments Available

RSVP: Networking@TheatreWomen.Org

SAVE THE DATES

Monday February 29, 2016, 6pm-8pm

Unsung Heroes:  Backstage Professionals

Monday, May 9, 2016, 6pm-8pm

New Wave:  Young Members and their Projects

LPTW Members: FREE                   Non-Members $15                        Non-Members with Theatrical Union Affiliation $10

The Power of Words…and Girls

Posted: 07/29/2015 6:22 pm EDT Updated: 07/30/2015 1:59 pm EDT

On a warm summer evening in Bedford, New York, surrounded by rolling hills and a warm audience of supporters, the girls introduced themselves, in all their diversity and honesty: “I’m yellow.” “I’m white.” “I’m caramel.” “I’m bi.”

The bullied girl who found school “the scariest place to be,” who “went to the blade because I felt afraid.” Jewel.

The girl who “just because I’m in seventh grade doesn’t mean I’m any less discriminated against.” Emma.

The girl whose dad “beat my mom for 15 years, [but though] she was down she brought herself up.” “Elizabeth.”

“Sticks and stones can break your bones,” finished one, but words can hurt you.”

Words are the currency, and the power, of the young performers of Girl Be Heard, artists and activists who bring global issues affecting girls center stage in cutting-edge theatre. The nonprofit company has performed at the White House, the United Nations, the State Department, TED conferences, and in underserved communities locally and globally. Major original productions have addressed homelessness, the rape epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, sex trafficking, and gun violence.

Girl Be HeardIt always starts with the personal. When Hazel joined Girl Be Heard, she heard the story of Melanie, whose brother was shot and killed in 2010–something she could not have experienced otherwise. So she shared her stories too. “Society teaches us to gulp down pain and not be vulnerable,” Hazel says. “Girl Be Heard gives us a place where we can be vulnerable.” As Executive Director and Co-Founder Jessica Greer Morris pronounces, “We take the shame out of the equation…and show that you can rise above adversity.”

And they change lives. “I owe this group so much,” says Alexandra Saali, a founding member from 2008 who now serves as a Young Professionals “Amplifer” for Girl Be Heard. Hearing about the plights of Congolese women and the other girls gave her “purpose, mission, and the drive that kept me on track through the crazy years of growing up.” Alexandra is bound for medical school after she graduates from Brown University.

Brmuda

Julienne Lusenge (r), President of Female Solidarity for Integrated Peace and Development, a coalition of 40 women’s organizations in DR Congo, so believes in Girl Be Heard that her daughter Raissa is joining. Also at the Bedford home of Chairperson Jackie Shapiro was former Premier of Bermuda Dame Pamela Gordon-Banks (l), to be honored at this year’s “Gotta Love Girls” Gala.

In Bermuda, she said, “We have a saying: ‘For each one, reach one, teach one.'” She went on to share the impact of Girl Be Heard performing in Bermuda, “where, being a small country, people can be quiet. These young ladies made it possible for people to realize they can have a voice, and that everyone has a story. With a support system you can do and be anything. The sky is the limit.”

Which is at the core of Girl Be Heard’s philosophy: if a girl can change her own life, she can change the lives of girls everywhere.

This upcoming season, the girls will address eating disorders and the $55-billion-dollar-a-year diet industry in a documentary theatre and dance piece called Embodi(ED). They also have workshops, school groups, and ensembles. When girls audition, Artistic Director and Co-Founder Ashley Marinaccio is looking for “raw talent, passion, and the potential to develop as an artist and thinker.” Most important: “someone with something to say.”

Mom & Daughter

Girl Be Heard takes it from there. “Our job is to put Miracle-Gro on these young talents,” says Greer Morris, to empower young women to become brave, socially conscious leaders in their communities. They also build lasting and invaluable community–family, really–for the girls. “Once you’re a member of Girl Be Heard…you’re with Girl Be Heard for life.” Full disclosure–my daughter (r) is a proud member of Girl Be Heard. I’m a proud mom, who also works in philanthropy and knows “making a difference” when I see it.

Girl Be Heard is the real thing. They make a difference. They change lives. And they speak to us all.

Continuing the Conversation with. . . Marisa Vitali, actor/screenwriter/producer

SOHO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL WINNER
SOHO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL WINNER

In 2013, Marisa Vitali, Alysia Reiner and I sat down to talk about GRACE, the movie:  its message, its momentum and its moving evolutionary progress.  To bring you all up to date on GRACE, the movie, now with a SOHO International Film Festival premiere, Marisa and I talked about the inspirational arc of this project.

Here are some clips from our conversation:

Fran:  Oh my goodness.  It’s been quite a while since our last interview.  And it looks like you’re on fast forward here and I’m so excited about GRACE being at the Soho International Film Festival. So, how did it get there? What happened?

Marisa:  I’m really excited, too; actually, it’s like a week away, at this point. Just through the festival submission process.  Soho was on my list of festivals that I wanted to submit to right here in NYC and just patiently waited to hear back.

Fran:  When did you hear?

 M:  I think it was probably about the second week in March which is awesome because most festivals you hear back from like 3 weeks before the festival.  So, I feel that I’ve had enough time to prepare for the festival and the festival run.  So I’m really excited about that.

F:  And this is the first time you’re doing

 M:  Yes, this is the first time GRACE is coming out into the world.  Yes. It’s her premier; we’ll be screening here in New York and really I’m just kind of over the moon about it.  I can’t believe it’s happening.  It’s surreal.

F:  And it is happening!  And now that it’s happening, how about some updates? How has this process given you clarity in terms of your objective?

 M:  I realize more and more that this film is not my film in the fact that I realize it’s so much bigger than me.  And, yes, I’ve taken all the actions I could possibly take in having her come out into the world, to tell this story, and show up for her.  But at the end of the day, it’s totally in God’s hands, you know, and I really, really truly believe that.  And I feel that as I’ve gone on this journey since we last spoke I see that and believe that, and have trust in that more and more.

F:  And in terms of your original intent of this movie, about this movie being about a movie about hope and about celebration.  Could you talk a little bit about that?

 M:  I really feel that there is a billion dollar industry built around the problem of addiction and I really want to be part of the solution.  And in talking with a lot of people it’s always kind of brought up about addiction and the problem and I really want to change that and talk about the solution.  I feel that in being in the hope and being GRACE, a story of recovery, it kind of allows us to settle into that conversation.

F:  What is it about film, as a genre, that can affect change and achieve that objective?

 M:  I think there is something to be said about sitting in a dark room filled with people you know and people you don’t know, and it being comforting in a way.  But, at the same time having your own experience watching a story unfold and that it’s safe to be able to kind of go on this journey and to find identification with these characters and kind of see how you really feel about addiction, and recovery, and like what you question, and what you think about it. And the fact that you are in this dark room with all of these people, it’s safe to explore your own feelings about that.

F:  How is GRACE  your way to measure success by taking positive action?

 M:  It’s so interesting that you say that because going into the last week before the festival is really what I’ve been sitting with is this idea of celebration.  I have really truly come to understand that every tear, every joy, every defeat, every victory in my life has been leading me to this one point.  Of GRACE.  And so, with that thought that I’ve been sitting with is just kind of being open to that kind of experience.  And really celebrating that life which has led me to this point.

F:  People have watched your film.  How do you know GRACE has already been a success by taking positive action?

M:  Well, I can share one story in the fact that there was a young man that had seen the film and it was in a business situation so he had seen the film and I was speaking with someone else, and there was no comment, no feedback given about the film and then when the other person was no longer present this person began to share with me his own journey of sobriety and how only his family knows about it and how professionally he hasn’t come out and shared it with anyone.  I just thought that was so beautiful that here is this stranger that I’m somewhat working with who felt comfortable enough to share his own experience and his own journey and how he was moved by GRACE and that in itself touched me so much.  I felt that by sharing GRACE with him that he had an opportunity to kind of come out and share his experience.  Intellectually, you know that will happen that’s what you desire to happen when you’re creating something, but not until you’re actually in that moment with that person and just sharing that unspoken bond does it really have a whole effect kind of thing.  And it was just so beautiful.  We kind of just stood in silence and we both shared a tear and a hug and it was like I didn’t even need to know all the details of his story.  We just both knew.  I think that is the beauty of recovery and being on the other side of all of this and what I shared with this young man is that bringing compassion to this disease and allowing ourselves to feel that much more comfortable talking about it, expressing our feelings about it.  I think that’s really beautiful.

F:  And you’re really beautiful.  See you on the red carpet!

http://www.grace-the-movie.com/

http://www.grace-the-movie.com/trailer

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