Erika L. Ewing: Fashioning Change

When we’re talking about the power of The Arts — the healing, the transformative powers — we’re really talking about the fact that we’re human. We’re humanizing the experience of others. So, we lead with empathy, and we lead in such a way that we put ourselves in someone else’s shoes. It’s more than meeting people for where they are –it’s BEING where they are. It’s getting inside of where they are . . . I can see new possibilities. NOW what can I do to change things?

Erika Lucille Ewing is a social impact entrepreneur and a
multimedia creative, actor, activist, and fashion designer,
“ARTIVIST.”

As former Chief of Staff of Black Lives Matter of Greater New York (BLMNY) Erika along with the powerful women of BLMNY organized the “Find Our Girls’ March to bring attention to the missing Black and Brown girls and youth across the globe. 

Got To Stop LLC is a social impact consulting company and lifestyle fashion brand that raises awareness about social injustice and empowers communities to take action. Got To Stop LLC designs clothing to invite courageous conversations around racism, poverty, health disparities, human trafficking, gun violence, voter suppression, domestic violence, and criminal justice reform.

Erika is very active in her Harlem community. In 2020, she co-produced the Black Lives Matter Mural in
Harlem. Erika has gained a stellar reputation and credibility as a community connector.
Most recently, Erika’s contributions to UNITAS (United Together Against Human Trafficking) curriculum
development team helped earn UNITAS the 2022 Anthem Award for its Transformative Anti-Human
Trafficking Curriculum. The curriculum is currently being implemented in NYC and D.C. public schools.

In addition to creating fashion for change, one of Erika’s goals is to create conversation collections for luxury fashion brands and cars. You can reach out to her at any of the social media channels.
Erika believes in the power of the arts to heal, unite, and be a catalyst for social justice, change, and
transformation.
Got To Stop LLC… It’s Not A Movement. It’s A Lifestyle

Erika holds a Bachelor of Arts from Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, and a Master of
Fine Arts in Theater Arts from Mason Gross School of The Arts at Rutgers University. She is a member of the Actors Equity Association and Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.

IG/FB Twitter:
@gottosopllc

Jessica Wu: Open Access Paths to Success

Actors Equity is opening its doors. I think this is one of the most exciting things that’s happening in my almost two decades as a Union member. It shifts the way people can become members. . . It is now OUR choice to become a member and that’s incredible.

Jessica Wu is an award-winning NYC-based playwright, director, songwriter, educator, and actor. Performance credits include the Broadway revivals of A Chorus Line and Miss Saigon, and she is the writer of numerous theatrical works including several full-length musicals – YOU, ME, I, WE (O’Neill Conference Semi-Finalist, Live & In Color Finalist, Winner of NAAP’s Discover New Musicals), and Poupelle of Chimney Town (debuting in Tokyo, Fall 2021; NYC, Summer 2022). In addition to her writing, Jessica is an Adjunct Theatre Professor at American University in Washington DC, and a Lyricist-Mentor with the Harvard-Radcliffe G&S Players. After spending several years running a Times-Sq non-profit theatre as Associate Artistic Director, Jessica is now is the owner/operator of her own consulting and development company Inspirate Creative. 

More than writing, directing, dancing, or producing my own projects – I love helping other creatives find their voice. 

In these past 2 decades, I’ve worked with a lot of creative people, on a lot of creative endeavors, in a lot of different stages of creative development. I’ve witnessed some incredible successes, but I’ve also seen innovative concepts fail to launch and brilliant ideas buried in mundane works.

I can 100% say: the most successful artists I’ve met are those who are truest to their own voice and the story they have to tell. 

While this may seem simple to the non-artist – believe me, I know from first-hand experience how impossible it can be with hundreds of other people’s influences, opinions and demands (not to mention your own hyperactive ideas and intense self-doubt) swirling around you. 

And, even though it is more-than-often single-minded, lonely work – I sincerely believe you shouldn’t have to be on that creative journey alone. 

That’s where I come in.

Through open-hearted collaboration, we can work together to help you and your work soar. 

I’m here to amplify your creativity and I can’t wait to connect with you.

Everything is storytelling and you are the storyteller. Your story and how you tell it has no choice but to be unique.

But I’ve worked with too many directors, producers, dramaturgs, and so-called ‘artist-mentors’ whose version of guidance is to impose their ideas, their ego, upon your work. 

So, I’m here to help you find your voice. Not their voice. Not my voice.

Your voice. 

Open Access  · Actors’ Equity Association (actorsequity.org)

As actor and delegate Jessica Wu (she/her) said, “To open up access to, especially, these communities who have been historically excluded from our industry through systemic racism, opening up that one pathway to be able to be seen, is a big step. It does not do anything to make more jobs, specifically for BIPOC artists. But it opens the door.”

#OpenAccessEquity #AsianActor #AEA #JessicaWu #BaayorkLee #Actor #FirstOnlineWithFran #Arts Advocacy

FB/Instagram: @woohoojwu

Extraordinary Women Telling an Extraordinary Story: SHADOWS ROUND THE MOON

“This is a story of incredible love and extraordinary loss. The play is a chance to introduce an amazing woman to the world since Mary Shelley has not received the attention she deserves. People will be astounded to learn about the many tragedies she suffered. And yet, she survived. This play allows her to talk about how she did that, in her own words, her own voice.” ~ Kate Burton

“Many people know Mary Shelley as the writer of Frankenstein, but they don’t know what an extraordinary person she was,” says actress Kate Burton. “I didn’t know until I read Janice’s play.”

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Mary Shelley, author FRANKENSTEIN

Shadows Round the Moon came to Kate after playwright Janice Kennedy presented an excerpt at the Santa Monica Library and an actor in the audience asked her for a copy of the script. “He contacted me later and said he knew someone who would be a great match for the material, ” remembers Janice. “I didn’t know it was Kate, but he was absolutely right. Kate is perfect.”

Janice had a chance to see Kate as Mary Shelley when Kate did a reading of Shadows Round the Moon at a Women in Film benefit in Los Angeles. “It was extraordinary to watch her,” says Janice. “Even with no movement or staging, Kate transformed herself into Mary Shelley and the audience was mesmerized. They gave her a well-deserved standing ovation.”

Flash forward to Spring 2017 with Kate in a critically acclaimed revival of Present Laughter on Broadway. Kate and Janice decided this would be a good time to introduce Shadows Round the Moon to New York people. They set up an informal presentation at the Dramatists Guild and invited several Broadway producers and a rep from the Williamstown Theatre Festival. Janice gave an overview of the play and Kate read a couple of excerpts. The May presentation was so successful that a full reading of the play took place this past Wednesday, July 12th at the Dramatists Guild.

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Janice Kennedy and Kate Burton   Photo Credit Ellis Gaskell 

 

“This is a story of incredible love and extraordinary loss,” says Kate. “The play is a chance to introduce an amazing woman to the world since Mary Shelley has not received the attention she deserves. People will be astounded to learn about the many tragedies she suffered. And yet, she survived. This play allows her to talk about how she did that, in her own words, her own voice.”

 

To find that voice, Janice read Mary’s letters and journals as well as biographies of Mary and her husband, the Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Janice found that even though Frankenstein was a publishing sensation, Mary did not receive much money for it. Copyright laws at the time she wrote the book did not favor the “creators” of literary works and music.

After Percy Shelley died, Mary was dependent on her father-in-law for money and forbidden by him to write Percy’s biography, even though she was constantly asked to do so by publishers. “This became the catalyst for the play,” says Janice. “What if Mary, as a way to write about Percy, wrote the story of her own life?”

This story begins with the death of Mary’s mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, when she was but a few days old. In the play, Mary Shelley talks about this being her introduction to “Mr. Bones,” her personification of Death.

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Kate Burton Photo Credit Ellis Gaskell 

The death of Mary Wollstonecraft reverberated throughout England because she was both revered and reviled as the founder of modern feminism with her book, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. After Wollstonecraft’s death,  Mary was raised by her father, William Godwin, a radical philosopher whose house was often visited by other philosophers and poets of the day, including Percy Shelley. As Mary grew up, she often hid on the stairs to listen to the talk of these men.

Kate Burton says she can relate to this experience of Mary’s. Recently, an old friend of her father’s came to see Kate in Present Laughter. He told her of sitting on the stairs as a child and listening in on the gatherings his father would have with people like Noel Coward, John Gielgud, Terrence Rattigan and Somerset Maugham.

At sixteen, Mary meets and falls in love with Percy Shelley at her father’s house. Janice’s research told her that the relationship that developed was not typical of the times. “Percy was devoted to the writings of Mary Wollstonecraft and truly believed the younger Mary was his equal — that she was as smart as or smarter than him,” says Janice. “Percy and Mary fell deeply in love and established an extraordinary partnership where they fueled each other’s ideas. Unfortunately, their life together was marked by tragedy after tragedy that began with the death of their first child when she was but a few days old.”

A few days after their baby’s death, Mary woke to tell Percy that she dreamed their little girl was “only cold and that we rubbed her by the fire, and she lived.” This dream of “reanimation,” Mary would say later, provided the seed for Frankenstein.

Two more of Mary and Percy’s children would die as small children and Mary suffered a miscarriage while in Italy that almost took her life as well. It was in Italy that Mary and the world suffered the loss of Percy Bysshe Shelley when he drowned at age 29 while sailing in the Mediterranean. Mary was only 25.

“These are things I do not want to remember,” Mary says in the play. “But remember I must, as we all must. What we have known, we cannot cease to know.”

Janice says she titled her play “Shadows Round the Moon” because Percy Shelley used the moon as his symbol for Mary in his poetry. And as Mary recounts her life in the play, all of the deaths she endured are like shadows surrounding and haunting her. “I made it a one-woman drama so that Mary is finally the focus of the story,” says Janice. “While Mary was alive, no one but Percy seemed to realize her brilliance. The irony is that he was largely credited with writing Frankenstein, something he consistently denied.”

Critics especially had a hard time believing that a young woman, only 17 at the time, could have written such a tale. One reviewer of Frankenstein exclaimed that “this is the foulest toadstool that has sprung up on the dung heap of mankind.”

“But what do critics, know?” counters Kate, who seems to intuitively understand Mary Shelley since Mary was raised in a “British culture” as she was. And Kate grew up in an artistic and literary family as well. Her father, Richard Burton, was an actor as was her mother Sybil, who became a literary agent and then a theatre manager. Sybil, in fact, founded The Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor, NY. But Kate says she didn’t know she was going to pursue the arts until her senior year of college:

I was going to be a diplomat but in my senior year at Brown, I decided to apply to drama schools. I knew that as the daughter of a famous actor, I would need all the proper  training. The basic decision became whether I would go to graduate school in England or  America because I am a British National. So, that was the only big fight in the family. Not with my mom, but with my dad. He wanted me to go to Britain and I said no, I was an American. So I went to Yale. I had a very interesting, good, and hard time while I was there. My first big job after graduate school was playing the ingénue in Present Laughter directed by George C. Scott, which was crazy.

For nearly 17 years, Kate was a working actress and then in her 40s, Hedda Gabler and The Elephant Man came along and “that changed my life as an actress because suddenly I was being moved into a different pantheon: I was no longer an ingénue and I was no longer a character actress. I could do more. That was 16 years ago. Then I went through a fallow period and I auditioned for this television show about doctors called Grey’s Anatomy. I was to be the mom of the leading lady, a mom who had early onset Alzheimer’s. I thought , ‘Oh my God, what a horrible thing.’ And I ended up [with] THAT [changing] my life and that was great.”

What does Kate think about the challenge of doing a one-woman show like Shadows Round the Moon?  “It’s very hard learning an hour-and-twenty-minute monologue and then, of course, I love being on stage with my fellow actors. But it has to be Mary’s story. It has to be her voice.”

Realizing the significance of providing role models, Kate values women writers like Mary Shelley and playwright Janice Kennedy.  “We’re in a time when women are being heralded in a way they haven’t been before . . . I am glad that women are being rewarded not because they’re women but because they’ve done a fantastic job.  We have two plays on Broadway right now written by women and that’s exciting.  They’re both Pulitzer Prize winners from before. They have stayed the course.”

Kate’s career arc is one built over the years:  “I came into my own in my 40s,” she says. “For me, now it’s about focusing in on what I really want to do for the rest of my time.”

After taking five years off from being active in the Union, Kate is running for the Council at Actor’s Equity  “because I know that I’m good at that, I know that I’m good at being a Union person. That’s a place that I can be helpful.” She is on the board of Broadway Cares and works with the AIDS Foundation in AIDS education. Her life is good, says Kate, and she wants to give back.

“I am very lucky to be in this amazing Broadway production right now that is going incredibly well critically and financially,” she says. “It’s so thrilling. Now, I’m about to become a “Professor of Practice” at the University of Southern California in August.” Kate’s husband, Michael Ritchie, is the artistic director of the Center Theatre Group (CTG) in LA so she’s happy she’ll be living on the West Coast again. The CTG includes the Taper Forum, the Ahmanson and the Kirk Douglas theatres.

And the best is yet to come with the possibility of her own one-woman show about Mary Shelley. Helen Mirren once said, “Your 40s are good. Your 50s are great. Your 60s are fab.  And 70 is fucking awesome.“ Kate would probably agree with that as she looks forward to more incredible opportunities coming her way.

For more information about the play contact Janice Kennedy

Pan Asian Repertory presents ACQUITTAL

Pan Asian Repertory Theatre expands new ground with ACQUITTAL, building on past explorations of untold stories from countries in conflict, with Shaheed Nadeem’s powerful, acclaimed play from Pakistan, which spurred the Women’s Rights Movement in the 80’s.  We see, daily, new examples of violations against women in all guises globally –large and small, blatant and subliminal, publicized and covert — and ACQUITTAL  affirms that collectively.  In resistance, we can make a difference, for social justice and change.  Pan Asian is proud to welcome this extraordinary work to the New York Stage.

We are all imprisoned in separate places,”  a line spoken from ACQUITTAL, by Shahid Nadeem, expresses the thematic thrust of the play:  tightly woven narratives about four women who lived in Pakistan in the early 1980’s during the aftermath of the military coup led by General Mohammad Zia-ul-Haq.

The tautly-talented ensemble of Aizzah Fatima, Shetal Shah, Gulshan Mia, and Salma Shaw, deftly directed by Noelle Ghoussaini exposes each character’s ethical core with authenticity lacking any didactic deference; instead, their camaraderie unfolds with a natural human curiosity to understand each other’s dilemmas thereby allowing the audience to empathize with them and raise their hopes for each of their acquittals.

I don’t want to give away any spoilers, other than to encourage everyone to see this play — not only for its candid treatment of the continuing challenge of garnering equal rights for ALL women, but also to “sensitize the masses”  — the notion that theatre brings people together in a dark room to witness the human condition.  And in today’s divisive political climate we can all benefit from stepping in the shoes of these women to consider what change we can bring to our culture.

Opening Night, Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 8 pm

Performances of ACQUITTAL:
The Studio Theatre on 4fl at Theatre Row (410 W. 42nd St.) in New York City June 10-25, 2017.
Tues through Sat at 7:30PM and matinees Sat & Sun at 2:30PM.
Tickets are $62.25 for Opening Night (June 15, 2017, includes post-show reception with cast) and $42.25 for all other performances and can be purchased by calling 212-239-6200 or online at http://www.telecharge.com. For instructions on how to receive discounts for students and IDNYC Members, please call 212-868-4030.

Click here for ACQUITTAL Tickets

 

 

 

 

 

Our Mother’s Brief Affair: LI Premiere

I will be performing the role of Anna Cantour

in

OUR MOTHER’S BRIEF AFFAIR

by Richard Greenberg

Studio Theatre will be the first Long Island theatre to present
this off-Broadway drama about a woman who stuns her family
by revealing a secret about her past. But how much of it is true?

Hope you can make the show!

January 13th through January 29th

 

mymothersbriefaffairfinal

Fridays @8:00PM – 1/13, 1/20, 1/27

Saturdays @8:00PM – 1/14, 1/21, 1/28

Sundays @2:30PM – 1/15, 1/22, 1/29

Thursday, @8:00PM – 1/19

Directed by David Dubin

Edward Cress as her son, Seth

Lauren Duffy, daughter Abby

David Rifkind, her Lover/Dad

Tom DeAngelo, Stage Manager

Ticketshttp://www.studiotheatreli.com

For industry seats:  franceslmcgarry@gmail.com

Directions to Studio Theatre LI:

From the Southern State Pkwy: Take exit 35 south (Wellwood Avenue). Pass Route 109. Then pass Sunrise Highway (Route 27). Studio Theatre is on South Wellwood Avenue, 100 feet south of Hoffman Avenue (LIRR train trestle overhead). Theatre is on the right, above Bridal Shop.

From Route 27A : North on Wellwood Avenue. Theatre is on the left, just before the train trestle overhead. We are above the Bridal Shop.