Pan Asian Repertory presents ACQUITTAL

Pan Asian Repertory Theatre expands new ground with ACQUITTAL, building on past explorations of untold stories from countries in conflict, with Shaheed Nadeem’s powerful, acclaimed play from Pakistan, which spurred the Women’s Rights Movement in the 80’s.  We see, daily, new examples of violations against women in all guises globally –large and small, blatant and subliminal, publicized and covert — and ACQUITTAL  affirms that collectively.  In resistance, we can make a difference, for social justice and change.  Pan Asian is proud to welcome this extraordinary work to the New York Stage.

We are all imprisoned in separate places,”  a line spoken from ACQUITTAL, by Shahid Nadeem, expresses the thematic thrust of the play:  tightly woven narratives about four women who lived in Pakistan in the early 1980’s during the aftermath of the military coup led by General Mohammad Zia-ul-Haq.

The tautly-talented ensemble of Aizzah Fatima, Shetal Shah, Gulshan Mia, and Salma Shaw, deftly directed by Noelle Ghoussaini exposes each character’s ethical core with authenticity lacking any didactic deference; instead, their camaraderie unfolds with a natural human curiosity to understand each other’s dilemmas thereby allowing the audience to empathize with them and raise their hopes for each of their acquittals.

I don’t want to give away any spoilers, other than to encourage everyone to see this play — not only for its candid treatment of the continuing challenge of garnering equal rights for ALL women, but also to “sensitize the masses”  — the notion that theatre brings people together in a dark room to witness the human condition.  And in today’s divisive political climate we can all benefit from stepping in the shoes of these women to consider what change we can bring to our culture.

Opening Night, Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 8 pm

Performances of ACQUITTAL:
The Studio Theatre on 4fl at Theatre Row (410 W. 42nd St.) in New York City June 10-25, 2017.
Tues through Sat at 7:30PM and matinees Sat & Sun at 2:30PM.
Tickets are $62.25 for Opening Night (June 15, 2017, includes post-show reception with cast) and $42.25 for all other performances and can be purchased by calling 212-239-6200 or online at http://www.telecharge.com. For instructions on how to receive discounts for students and IDNYC Members, please call 212-868-4030.

Click here for ACQUITTAL Tickets

 

 

 

 

 

Leveraging Theatre for Social Good

Before it was fashionable to be an advocate or activist, my acquaintance Jessie Fahay invited me to join her very new theatre group. She had a vision to pair advocacy with theatrical productions, taking on socially relevant topics.

Jessica Jennings, Development Director of Ripple Effect Artists proudly talks about how they have stayed attuned to the most relevant issues pulling on the collective social conscience of all Americans:

That was in 2010. Seven years later, I could not be more proud of our endeavors and accomplishments at Ripple Effect Artists. Aside from the administrative feats, like becoming a 501(c)3 and earning grant funds, I mean that I am proud that we have stayed tuned to the most relevant issues pulling on the collective social conscience of all Americans. For example, we presented Tea & Sympathy, a play from the 50s about the bullying of homosexuals, and raised funds for the Trevor Project’s suicide prevention call center.

With each of our productions we both raise awareness with our audience, and make a financial donation toward an advocacy organization. We have worked with 11 different organizations on issues of heath care, suicide prevention, hospice, marriage equality, women’s rights, technology unemployment, sex trafficking, and now we will be looking at racism.

Our productions are paired with audience engagements such as talk-backs. While our dramas are wonderful for getting people curious about issues, real-world information and solutions from experts leave the audience empowered, informed, and pointed in a direction of taking action. Our audiences have reported taking these actions after our events: volunteering, signing petitions, conversing about these challenging issues in their own communities, and ending their participation in buying sex.

I am honored to have my work with Ripple Effect Artists as part of my artistic legacy. I like to say, in the spirit of Martha Graham, that there is no higher calling than to be fully used by our art.

Please get to know us better! We have a FREE event on May 11th, and a fundraiser on May 30th. Details and links are below.

Guarding the Bridge

May 11th @7pm

250 Park Ave., People’s United Bank.

FREE reading of Chuck Gorden’s GUARDING THE BRIDGE

Click here to RSVP

The Edge of Everyday

May 30th @ 8pm

Elektra Theatre, 300 W. 43rd St.

$45-$60 Tickets 

Rippleeffect.Jennings@gmail.com

 

TAKE IT AWAY! UNSUNG HEROES: BACKSTAGE PROFESSIONALS

Best advice of the evening offered by these backstage pros: “Gather the women around you!” And we did.  And we shall.

The League of Professional Theatre Women’s Networking Committee leaped forward February 29, 2016 to a packed house honoring Broadway’s UNSUNG HEROES: BACKSTAGE PROFESSIONALS  at TheatreLab 6-8 pm with star panelists:

Carey Bertini (Broadway dresser); Wendy Davidson (Local One Stagehand); Christina Grant (Hair & Make-up Artists); Starlet Jacobs (Set Designer); Eileen Macdonald (Sound Engineer); Marilyn Rennagel (Lighting Designer) and Sylvia Yoshioka (House Electrician).  Moderated by Broadway Producer, Jane Dubin.

Guests included members of  International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees( I.A.T.S.E.) Local One President James J. Claffey, Jr., Roundabout Theatre’s Stage Manager, Karen Loftus, SAG-AFTRA members, Dr. Christin Essin, Vanderbilt University, Pat Addis, Producer AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, League Board members, Co-President Pamela Hunt, among others.

Listen to some of the Take It Away! responses that resonated with audience members: Rachel Brill, Julia DuCordis, Rebecca Meckler, Carolyn Meckler, Stella Berg, Lizzy Bryce, Paula Cohen, Sandra M. Bloom, Fern Jones, Celeste Kirkland, Briana Stuart, Judy Binus, Martha Steketee, Judie Tallman, Yana Landowne, Jane Dubin, Kelly Mele, Erica Payne, Pat Addis, Jessica Parks, Mae Framleberger, Debbie Slevin, JennyLyn Bader, Lorca Peress, Julie Sylvestor, Melanie Sutherland, MariLyn Henry, Christin Essin.

Take It Away! Interviewer:  Richarda Abrams

Brought to you by your LPTW Networking Committee:  Joan Kane and Frances McGarry, Co-Chairs; Richarda Abrams, Ivy Austin, Katherine Elliot, Victoria Hale, Lorna Lable, Dorothy Leeds, Mary McGinley, Romy Nordlinger, June Rachelson-Ospa, Wendy Peace, Amie Sponza; Elizabeth Strauss, Apprentice

 

 

 

League of Professional Theatre’s NETWORKING MONDAYS; Meet the Music Makers!

In our continuing effort to develop and promote women in the professional theatre  we invite you to . . .

Networking Logo

NETWORKING MONDAYS

 Insights, Information, and Inspiration

Join your colleagues, expand your networks, bring a potential new member!

Monday, October 5, 2015, 6pm-8pm

Meet the Music Makers: Composers & Lyricists and

Special Guests discussing the Creative, Legal, and Financial Aspects of Songwriting


 Ripley Grier Studios 520 8th Avenue, Studio 16T

 Panelists include GEORGIA STITT (Snow Child, My Lifelong Love); DONNA MOORE (Cougar The Musical); JUNE RACHELSON-OSPA & ALLISON BREWSTER-FRANZETTI (The True Colors of Weedle); CARMEL OWEN (Asylum: The Strange Case of Mary Lincoln); PAMELA GOLINSKI (Entertainment Attorney FGR & S PLLC); and TED CHAPIN (President, Rodgers & Hammerstein)

Light Refreshments Available

RSVP: Networking@TheatreWomen.Org

SAVE THE DATES

Monday February 29, 2016, 6pm-8pm

Unsung Heroes:  Backstage Professionals

Monday, May 9, 2016, 6pm-8pm

New Wave:  Young Members and their Projects

LPTW Members: FREE                   Non-Members $15                        Non-Members with Theatrical Union Affiliation $10

Every Child Needs This: Learning Bravery with Compass Creative Dramatics

By Cathlyn Melvin, Development Director Compass Creative Dramatics

My summer vacations as a kid were a whirlwind of gymnastics practice, camping across mosquito-infested Wisconsin, and terrifying just-after-dark sessions of “Ghost in the Graveyard” with the twin boys who lived across the street. My favorite part of summer, though, was the time I spent at a children’s theatre in town. They did a project each August that I always looked forward to; there were no costumes, no sets, just the story and the actors. It made us all look forward to the school year, when the company would produce shows with detailed costumes and colorful sets.

I moved away after high school to study theatre at a university about two hours from my hometown. After graduation, I worked with theatre companies in the Milwaukee area, and then was offered a short contract with a children’s theatre company in Minnesota. I spent several weeks working with kids in rural Minnesota, and was reminded how much I loved children’s theatre when I was a teenager – and how much I still love it now.

Which is why I am so excited to be bringing the company I started last May, Compass Creative Dramatics, to my hometown of Sheboygan, WI this summer. We’re based out of Chicago, but we’re a traveling company that specializes in bringing theatre to your community (and in this case, to my own!). Organizations like schools, after-school centers, churches, or other groups, bring us in to work with their kids for a week, and it’s amazing to see the transformation of students from the first day to the last.

Last fall, we worked with a group of students in Evanston, Illinois. The first day, one of our students, Ella, she stood in the circle with the rest of the kids, but wouldn’t participate. When we asked her to repeat a few words after us, she just shook her head and looked at the floor.

By the end of the week, Ella was a leader in the cast. She knew all of her lyrics and dances, and she spoke her lines big and loud and with a grin on her face. This sort of transformation isn’t uncommon with this programming, and it’s partially possible because our structure includes two adult actors who perform alongside the students, offering support, and helping them shine. If a student forgets a line, we’re there to help them out. If they get a sudden attack of nerves, we’re next to them to calm their anxiety and lead the way.

In Sheboygan in June, my colleague Cassandra and I will work with up to 75 kids, meeting them on Monday, rehearsing with them throughout the week, and readying them for performance on Saturday. It’s an exercise in creativity and in bravery, and our students will walk away with a little more courage, a little more trust, and a sense of responsibility and teamwork. They’ll walk away with the magic of live performance, and I hope that never leaves them.

We’ll work with kids – in Sheboygan, in Chicago, in Indiana, and elsewhere – who, like Ella, need extra support to really come into their own. We’ll work with kids who haven’t learned to read, or who freeze at the thought of singing in front of an audience.

It’s experiences like this that confirm for me that theatre is a vital part of education. The poise, confidence, and bravery that come from participation in theatre are skills that every child needs to experience. Through Compass Creative Dramatics, we’re hoping to give kids that important opportunity – one community at a time.

Compass Creative Dramatics partners with school and community organizations to offer quirky, engaging theatre programming designed to provide arts enrichment and cultivate personal growth and character. We strive to provide these organizations an opportunity to enhance their current theatre education and life skills training as well as provide arts programming within schools and organizations with limited arts resources.