First Online With Fran Episode 2: Brooklyn Theatre Arts High School Students Speak Out

On April 5, 2013 First Online With Fran asked a group of students from Brooklyn Theatre Arts High School to respond to this statement, “The Arts are extra-curricular and disposable.”

Here’s what they had to say…

“You can’t take away something from someone that goes to bed every night and smile about. . . It helps you find who you are as a person and where you belong in this world.” ~Justin Figueroa

This is a critical moment for the future of education in New York City.

There’s change everywhere in education, and it’s never been a hotter political topic. Major cities like Chicago, Los Angeles and Portland have seen civic leaders join with parents, students, cultural organizations and businesses to expand access to arts education. New York City needs to be on that list.

The NYC Roundtable, together with more than 40 other cultural and educational agencies, invited the declared mayoral candidates to weigh in on what a quality education, including the arts, will look like if they are elected. Their responses are now up for all to see: View the responses now.

To become part of the solution sign a petition right now to show your support for arts and creative learning in New York’s educational future.

Visit CAE’s Arts Education Action Center! Here you’ll find tools, tips, and information to help ensure that all of New York City’s more than one million public school students are receiving an arts education.

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Sir Ken Robinson – Educating the Heart and Mind

Sir Ken Robinson speaks during the Dalai Lama Center’s Educating the Heart Series. He discusses the importance of an education that educates not just the mind, but also the heart.
http://www.dalailamacenter.org

Ask YoYo Ma About Arts Education


Panelists will discuss why they believe arts education is important for today’s generation, and question what needs to be done in society to ensure the arts play a prominent role in the education system.

And what’s even more exciting is that you can join in on the conversation too! Anytime before the session you can tweet your questions or comments about arts education to #AskYoYo or by email to artseducation@artsusa.org with the subject line #AskYoYo.

What is the Difference between Knowing and Understanding?

timthumb[7]Rosie Kerr, MEd
Blogger – The Artistic Edge

I recently read a discussion on LinkedIn about this question and it reminded me of why the arts are so important to preparing children for their future.

Knowing in its traditional North American definition, means being familiar with something. Having the facts in your mind. You know how to drive a car, but do you understand how the car works? You know your husband, but do you understand him?

Understanding involves connecting the facts with a context and grasping how, when and why something exists or occurs. I think most of us know more than we understand. There are also, of course, things we will never fully understand.

One of Einstein’s jewels of wisdom was that, “Any fool can know. The point is to understand.” 
Knowing is just the beginning, and understanding is the end goal. Read More…

Without the Arts, It’s Not Education

WE know there’s a drama, art, music, dance, classroom teacher who changed your life.  Every educator knows that within EACH and EVERY child lies an artistic soul waiting to be sparked.  SEND ME YOUR TESTIMONIAL:  How your third grade teacher taught you to write your first play, fingerprinting your fears away on an oily white sheet of paper, dance to the beat of your own drum, strum, blow, sing the lyrics that express your point of view.

Earlier this spring Secretary of Education Arne Duncan wrote that “dance, music, theater, and visual arts” are essential to preparing our nation’s young people for a global economy fueled by innovation and creativity.” That may be the case, but thanks to education funding cuts, the arts are being systematically stripped from our schools. According to creativity expert Sir Ken Robinson, what’s left can hardly be called an education.

“We may be providing something else, but it’s not what we want to think of as education,” Robinson told attendees at the recent Action Children’s Art Conference in the U.K. Instead, says Robinson, our children are growing up in a fast-paced world “that’s becoming more standardized,” which means kids “live within education cultures that are more prone to testing, to conformity, and to compliance than ever before.” Read more