All About Image/We Are The Elite

All About Image

Marcina Zaccaria’s All About Image/We Are The Elite

Directed by Tony Tambasco

 

A drama written in the present time, taking place in New York City and other parts of the U.S., All About Image/ We are the Elite is a journey of the people who make images. In the process of capturing and making these images, the characters explore their personal relationships while re-affirming their aesthetic principles.

What they see is under critique. What they present is a complete outpouring of their entire vision.

Part of the New York International Fringe Festival

Photos courtesy Steven Pisano

Kraine Theater

85 East 4th Street

New York, NY 10003

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October 3 @ 7:00pm

October 4 @ 7:00pm

October 5 @ 5:15pm

October 6 @ 5:30pm    

Featuring:

David Arthur Bachrach *

J. Dolan Byrnes *

Frances McGarry *

Jeff Burchfield *

Don Carter *

Catherine Luciani

Milton Lyles II

Nana Ponceleon

Akin Salawu

Lourdes Severny

Kelsey Shapira Katy Wilson
* Appears courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association


Further details at Fringe BYOV.

Tickets available through Eventbrite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pan Asian Repertory presents ACQUITTAL

Pan Asian Repertory Theatre expands new ground with ACQUITTAL, building on past explorations of untold stories from countries in conflict, with Shaheed Nadeem’s powerful, acclaimed play from Pakistan, which spurred the Women’s Rights Movement in the 80’s.  We see, daily, new examples of violations against women in all guises globally –large and small, blatant and subliminal, publicized and covert — and ACQUITTAL  affirms that collectively.  In resistance, we can make a difference, for social justice and change.  Pan Asian is proud to welcome this extraordinary work to the New York Stage.

We are all imprisoned in separate places,”  a line spoken from ACQUITTAL, by Shahid Nadeem, expresses the thematic thrust of the play:  tightly woven narratives about four women who lived in Pakistan in the early 1980’s during the aftermath of the military coup led by General Mohammad Zia-ul-Haq.

The tautly-talented ensemble of Aizzah Fatima, Shetal Shah, Gulshan Mia, and Salma Shaw, deftly directed by Noelle Ghoussaini exposes each character’s ethical core with authenticity lacking any didactic deference; instead, their camaraderie unfolds with a natural human curiosity to understand each other’s dilemmas thereby allowing the audience to empathize with them and raise their hopes for each of their acquittals.

I don’t want to give away any spoilers, other than to encourage everyone to see this play — not only for its candid treatment of the continuing challenge of garnering equal rights for ALL women, but also to “sensitize the masses”  — the notion that theatre brings people together in a dark room to witness the human condition.  And in today’s divisive political climate we can all benefit from stepping in the shoes of these women to consider what change we can bring to our culture.

Opening Night, Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 8 pm

Performances of ACQUITTAL:
The Studio Theatre on 4fl at Theatre Row (410 W. 42nd St.) in New York City June 10-25, 2017.
Tues through Sat at 7:30PM and matinees Sat & Sun at 2:30PM.
Tickets are $62.25 for Opening Night (June 15, 2017, includes post-show reception with cast) and $42.25 for all other performances and can be purchased by calling 212-239-6200 or online at http://www.telecharge.com. For instructions on how to receive discounts for students and IDNYC Members, please call 212-868-4030.

Click here for ACQUITTAL Tickets

 

 

 

 

 

Marisa Vitali: Life Imitating Art: This is NOT an Act

Marisa Vitali
“It’s been a long road . . . but there is actually a moment when you choose to say, ‘THIS is what I’m going to be doing with the rest of my life.’”
A successful actress, voiceover artist, and producer in New York City, Marisa Vitali’s Long Island roots established the foundation to be where she is today. The arts were always a large part of her growing up; frequent trips to the city were a staple of family outings including visits to museums, attending the theater, coupled with fond memories as a nine-year-old staying up late on school nights to attend the opera with her dad at the Met (even though she would fall asleep before the end of the opera). And Christmas was not officially launched without seeing The Nutcracker at New York City Ballet. In addition to these family forays, her k-12 education in the Northport School District included an abundance of music and art programs having had access to choirs, orchestras, bands, musicals, and a theater program experience that was both a curriculum track and an after-school musical club: “I couldn’t even imagine what public school would be like without an arts program. For me, it’s like – our human spirit is the spirit of creativity and so to not have an outlet for that – to not have a place to cultivate that – I just don’t know what that human experience would be like and I can’t say it’s one that I would want to live.”

In fact, she credits the arts for saving her life. Despite her acceptance to the prestigious New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, Marisa’s life spiraled into the world of drug addiction. Stemming from childhood bullying and feelings of inadequacy Marisa’s drinking and drugging became the means to self-medicate that pain: “For me, having that first drink [became] the first time . . . I didn’t feel that pain. I don’t need to feel inferior, I’m not good enough. I don’t belong.” Going to clubs consumed her seven days a week. Despite this lifestyle, she excelled in all of her studies. Scheduling classes early in the day would accommodate her party existence to maintain her Dean’s list status. But when heroin became the drug of choice, Marisa’s existence became a vicious cycle of finding the next high. After years of denial, Marisa hit bottom and decided to get clean. At the time, the only promising venture she could imagine for herself was to sell perfume at a department store and “not that there’s anything wrong with working at Bloomie’s, but to think that a University graduate with a BFA was as big as I could comprehend at that time when I first got clean.” This was when her mentor, Lawrence Sacharow, a Broadway director, suggested she get back into acting: “It was the most healing experience I’ve ever had. . . and in that moment I realized that, for me, that was what I had to live for. At that point in time, that was the reason for me to stay clean and not go back to using.”

Utilizing the skills she learned from her years of study at NYU and taking acting classes at Michael Howard Studio, Marisa found it to be “the most therapeutic way to process my emotions.” After years of feeling disillusioned, she was determined to use this skill set in a positive way. “It’s kind of like when the head and the heart come together at one point; acting, for me, isn’t about performing, a performance. For me, it’s about the journey; for me, it’s about having an experience in that moment in time. As an actor I want to tell stories, and I think that the more life experience you can bring to your story the more full that story can be told.”

Having been through so much Marisa used that life experience to culminate in the creation of the film Grace, a screenplay by Chris Ordal, an award-winning director and screenwriter. The story is inspired by Marisa’s first year clean where the main character, Janice, finds herself back at home, poor, waitressing at the local diner and in a custody battle for her daughter. Faced with the truth of the wreckage of her past, she must cope with a series of events that transpire without going back to using drugs. What is of upmost importance to Marisa is that the film “starts the conversation of recovery between addicts and addicts; non-addicts and non-addicts.” Her desire is to use it as a teaching tool because “art is healing and what’s the best conversation starter other than the amazing piece of art or whatever forms that may be to get people to feel comfortable; to start talking.”

As for the vital importance of an arts education, Marisa argues that who among us hasn’t had to speak in front of an audience be it a committee or interview? Who doesn’t give a toast at a wedding which requires that poise and confidence to deliver? “The Arts,” Marisa asserts,” allows you to be who you are and accepts you regardless.” Moreso, the arts, “whether it be an art class, a play, or music — is an outlet for that emotion, for that feeling.” And like life imitating art: this is NOT an act.

Marisa Vitali

Check out the Sizzlin’ Fireworks Issue of the 2013 Summer Issue of GEM Magazine

Pilot Episode: First Online With Fran with Angelina Fiordellisi

“I think that one of our greatest responsibilities as theater providers,” asserts Angelina Fiordellisi, “is to sensitize the tribe . . . deepening our primal connections, our primal needs, our primal impulses and what Shakespeare calls ‘holding the mirror up to society’.” This poignant insight is particularly significant since the tragic course of events this past week in Newtown, Connecticut.

On November 19th, 2012 First Online With Fran featured Artistic Director and founder of the Cherry Lane Theatre, Angelina Fiordellisi. Listen to her reflect on the work at the Cherry Lane Theatre, most notably the 2013 Mentor Project, among others, and how they contribute to cultivating an urban artist colony, honor its ground-breaking heritage, create theater that illuminates contemporary issues and transforms the human spirit.

First Online With Fran was shot and edited by The New York Film Shop, Andrea Bertola, Artistic Director.

SUBSCRIBE NOW: http://www.youtube.com/user/FrancesMcgarry

Testimonial #14: Marisa Vitali, Actor, Producer, Writer

Marisa’s film Miracle Year is in production and will be shooting this fall at Tim’s Shipwreck Diner, in her hometown of Northport, Long Island.

How has your life been indelibly touched by a teacher who utilized the arts for whatever reason and acknowledge how they were instrumental in breaking the mold to allow you to become who you are today?

A teacher that touched my life, was none other than Frances McGarry herself. At the time, Frances McGarry was my TheaterWorks drama teacher, where she had us breathe life into the Classics. By the time I got to TheaterWorks, I was already performing and starring in the school musicals. Studying with Frances was a GREAT reality check. There was no “Star.” Here it was a Troupe, so leave your “EGO” at the door Please, Thank You very much.

What I got from her was how to be a PROFESSIONAL. I learned how to collaborate with others to fulfill the artistic vision of a piece, how to ask for help and most of all to how to consistently show up and do “The Work.” She held us in extremely high standards and there was no room for err. She wasn’t gonna take sh*t from anyone, especially some pimply, hormonal, hot shit teenager. Looking back it was the first time I was treated as an adult, a colleague, a fellow collaborator. When everything else in life at that time was an emotional chaos, when the door closed and the bell rung for TheaterWorks to begin, it was the time to achieve the very BEST of you.

marisa vitali