Review: That’s How Angels Arranged by Lillian Isabella

 

That’s How Angels Arranged: Inspired by Jonas Mekas

The Godfather of Avant-Garde Cinema

Lillian Jonas

 

That’s How Angels Arranged was inspired by the community of people who inhabit the East Village. Alex Roe, Artistic Director of Metropolitan Playhouse crafted the Alphabet City series, a theatrical production that captures snapshots of local personalities whose personal stories make for a fascinating dramatic presentation. Actor/Playwright Lillian Rodriguez crafted a creative composite of how 92 year-old Jonas Mekas left his indelible mark by founding Anthology Film Archives. He’s got a very unique personality and an interesting story coming from Europe, escaping from a forced labor camp and then coming to America to pursue his dream which was to film what he loves.

 

 

Reading Angels is transformative — providing an opportunity to connect with ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Lillian captures his essence, his humanity, his passion. In the divisive culture that now exists we can find virtue in our hearts and realize that through his voice and example, we, too, can reach across boundaries to make our world a better place. In the spirit of the holiday season buy a copy and share with your community.

The review of Lillian Isabella’s play That’s How Angel’s Arranged! Is now officially live on Amazon and over 70 copies have been purchased through Amazon already! Buy your copy now! Click here to order.

To learn more about the ABC Project click on an interview with First Online With Fran

I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review.

 

 

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Testimonial #48: Bryan Austermann, NYC Actor

How has your life been indelibly touched by a teacher who utilized the arts for whatever reason and acknowledge how they were instrumental in breaking the mold to allow you to become who you are today?

Bryann Madison County

Let [him] sing for you monsieur. [He’s] been well taught.” Tonight I got to perform for my 5th Grade teacher who I haven’t seen in about ten years. I’ve kept in touch with her from time to time and it was such a thrill to have her, I kid you not, BEAMING in the front row. It’s because of her that I saw my first Broadway show and realized what I wanted to do with my life. And tonight is proof enough that being in this gorgeously beautiful play is who I am and who I want to be. And Mrs. Arduini, I will always think of you fondly.
Bryann and Teacher

There’s No Place Like Art…The Reviews at IN!

FOLWF Podcast Art



One week ago I launched my first podcast THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE ART and audiences are listening. How about YOU?

One week statistics: 277 views.

241 First Online With Fran blog listeners.

36 iTunes downloads. 

I am a new podcast fan, and a new Frances McGarry fan. Her enthusiasm for her work is infectious, and for me personally, inspiring. I hope y’all will check out her blog, and let’s help get these podcasts on the map! Congratulations and good luck on your new venture, lady! `Susan Keller, FB Blogger, Political Satirist, Mom
A review from one of my new listening fan, Susan Keller…

Susan KellerSeptember 13 at 11:59pm 

One of her missions, between her blog and podcasts, is to illustrate various ways that art complements and enhances our lives, our work, and our relationships. Art, as she puts it, isn’t merely an amenity – it is a vital contributor to society. Studying and participating in different areas of the arts enables us to understand ourselves better and can teach us invaluable interpersonal skills. Frances hopes to bring this concept to her audiences through the interesting first-person narratives of her guests.
I am a new podcast fan, and a new Frances McGarry fan. Her enthusiasm for her work is infectious, and for me personally, inspiring. I hope y’all will check out her blog, and let’s help get these podcasts on the map! Congratulations and good luck on your new venture, lady!

There’s No Place Like Art!

First Online With Fran’s First Podcast

There’s No Place Like Art…

FOLWF Podcast Art

The Arts are imperative — a life journey, a life experience that is like no other.  The Arts brings people together all in one space.  The plays I’ve written have touched lives — they’ve changed lives and that’s what Art does. ~Dan McCormick, Playwright

The arts are an essential part of a complete education, no matter if it happens in the home, school, or community. Students of all ages—from kindergarten to college to creative aging programs—benefit from artistic learning, innovative thinking, and creativity. Celebrating National Arts in Education Week is a way to recognize this impact and share the message with friends, family, and communities.

Towards that end First Online With Fran celebrates National Arts in Education Week by launching her first podcast featuring guest Dan McCormick, playwright of The Violin  at 59E59 Theater.

The podcast offers opportunities for you to join her in discussions on how ordinary people are doing extraordinary things in The Arts to make our world a richer, deeper, better place to live. In these divisive times, tune in and listen to how The Arts transforms people’s lives and remind us how vitally important a role The Arts play in tapping into our humanity.

National Arts in Education Week

Arts in Education Week

Passed by Congress in 2010, House Resolution 275 designates the week beginning with the second Sunday in September as National Arts in Education Week. During this week, the field of arts education joins together in communities across the country to tell the story of the impact of the transformative power of the arts in education. Watch the video and join us in the celebration!

  1. Celebrate. Host a celebration in your community, whether big or small, an existing event, or a new one. Download and use the shared logo and be sure to register your event on ArtsMeet, a national arts event calendar.
  2. Advocate. Work with your elected officials and decision-makers to share the value of the arts in education. Whether a mayor, principal, or U.S. Congressman, check out sample resolutions and videos, send an op-ed to your local newspaper, and use the Arts Education Navigator—an online tool with six action steps to crafting a personal advocacy plan. Be sure to sign the petition encouraging Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to support the arts!
  3. Participate. Share your story in the social media campaign, #BecauseOfArtsEd, to bring national visibility to the issue of arts education. See below for more information and download the How To Guide. Also, be sure to attend and invite friends to the Facebook Event.